Mysterious Golden Spheres Found in Tunnel Beneath Mexican Pyramid

The massive pre-Columbian site of Teotihuacan just outside of Mexico City still has many mysteries. Reaching its height around 200 AD after the completion of two enormous pyramids, archaeologists still know very little about who built this place or why. As mysterious as the pyramids is the fact that they were constructed over enormous underground […]

Aztec Florentine Codex Now Online

The Florentine Codex contains a wealth of information about the Aztecs written by the Aztecs themselves and translated by the Spanish priest Sahagun. Having been completed in 1577 the book has now finally arrived on the Internet. Find out more below: Historia general de las cosas de nueva EspaƱa (General history of the things of […]

Forty New Rock Art Sites in Mexico

Rock-art has been discovered and recorded in forty sites in northeastern Guanajuato, Mexico, as part of an ongoing project carried out by researchers from the National Institute of Anthropology and History. The majority of the images were created by hunter-gatherers who occupied the area during the 1-5 centuries AD, but religious iconography and inscriptions were also discovered dating to the colonial era, as well as the 19th and early 20th centuries.

Maya Suspension Bridge

James O’Kon is using modern technology and forensic engineering techniques to uncover the mysteries of a vanished Mayan civilization. It began with a pile of rocks in the middle of the Usumacinta River deep in the rain forest between Mexico and Guatemala-the site of an ancient Mayan kingdom,

Approaching the Mayan ruins by dugout canoe, O’Kon, CE ’61, immediately realized the significance of the rock formation.

“That’s a bridge pier!” he declared.

Mexico finds bones suggesting Toltec child sacrifice

The grisly find of the buried bones of 24 pre-Hispanic Mexican children may be the first evidence that the ancient Toltec civilization sacrificed children, an archeologist studying the remains said on Monday.

The bones, dating from 950 AD to 1150 AD and dug up at the Toltecs’ former capital Tula, north of present day Mexico City, indicated the children had been decapitated in a group.

Carlos Museum

The Carlos Museum’s collection of art of the ancient Americas is substantial, consisting of more than 1,900 pieces: over 1,300 from the William C. and Carol W. Thibadeau collection and nearly 500 from the Laurence C. and Cora W. Witten II Collection. The Museum is fortunate in the breadth and depth of the collection as […]