Discovering Stone Mountain Museum

In Stone Mountain Park’s Memorial Hall, you’ll find the Discovering Stone Mountain Museum, where visitors can enjoy a great view of the carving and an intriguing chronological journey from Stone Mountain’s past to its present including information about the Native Americans who once occupied this area.

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The Native Americans are associated with two of Stone Mountain’s historical curiosities. The first, named “Devil’s Crossroads,” was a flat boulder roughly 200 feet across and 5 to 10 feet thick. It was cleft by two straight cracks about four feet wide, one running north-south and the other running east-west. The cracks joined at right angles in the center of the boulder and the juncture was capped by another flat rock 20 feet in diameter. The second curiosity was a wall, made of loose fragmentary stone, that encircled the top of the mountain.

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The Park also hosts an annual PowWow and Indian Festival.
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Carlos Museum

The Carlos Museum’s collection of art of the ancient Americas is substantial, consisting of more than 1,900 pieces: over 1,300 from the William C. and Carol W. Thibadeau collection and nearly 500 from the Laurence C. and Cora W. Witten II Collection. The Museum is fortunate in the breadth and depth of the collection as a whole. All three principal cultural centers of the Americas are represented: Mesoamerica, Central America, and the Andes. Most of the important art-producing cultures –from the West Mexico to the Maya and Aztec, from Honduras to Panama, from the Chavín to the Inca– can be appreciated during a visit to the permanent collection galleries. The Carlos Museum’s collections are unusually strong in ancient Costa Rica, featuring over 600 works from all periods.

Fernbank Museum

Fernbank’s signature exhibition, A Walk Through Time in Georgia, tells the two-fold story of Georgia’s natural history and the development of our planet. Sixteen galleries combine with theaters and dioramas to explain this complex and fascinating story. Explore the natural history of Georgia and the story of our planet as you journey through lifelike geographic regions and historic re-creations. Highlights include a dinosaur gallery, a giant sloth, a cave, and the modern-day sights and sounds of the Okefenokee Swamp.

Using pottery as a lens, Conveyed in Clay: Stories from St. Catherines Island explores 5,000 years of human history, from the oldest pots discovered in North America to the introduction of Spanish majolica in the mission era.

Featuring a selection of objects from the St. Catherines Island Foundation and Edward John Noble Foundation Collection, this new permanent exhibition examines how Native Americans adapted to changes in natural and cultural conditions through the evolution of their pottery. From the invention of simple pinch pots to the progressive engineering of more advanced coil pots, visitors will explore the innovative designs and the introduction of decorative embellishment as cultures interacted.