Carvings in Land Attest to Amazon’s Lost World

The earliest explorers of the Amazon recorded that it was filled with villages and towns. After European diseases swept the area and wiped out its inhabitants, the jungle regrew and hid all evidence of these civilizations. Later explorers would find no evidence of such civilizations and the archaeological community, in all their brilliance and wisdom, decided they never existed and were simply the product of the overactive imaginations of the early explorers. In typical academic fashion, they then went on to create theories of why no such civilizations could have existed based on the low quality of the soils. The theories became established dogma and anyone who suggested the early eyewitness accounts might be true were considered fringe, nutty Atlantis seekers. Yet the latest research verifies the accuracy of the early eyewitness accounts and once more exposes the flaws and blind adherence to dogma of modern academia. Read the New York Times story below about the discovery of geoglyphs discovered in “pristine” jungle:

RIO BRANCO, Brazil — Edmar Araújo still remembers the awe. As he cleared trees on his family’s land decades ago near Rio Branco, an outpost in the far western reaches of the Brazilian Amazon, a series of deep earthen avenues carved into the soil came into focus.

“These lines were too perfect not to have been made by man,” said Mr. Araújo, a 62-year-old cattleman. “The only explanation I had was that they must have been trenches for the war against the Bolivians.”

But these were no foxholes, at least not for any conflict waged here at the dawn of the 20th century. According to stunning archaeological discoveries here in recent years, the earthworks on Mr. Araújo’s land and hundreds like them nearby are much, much older — potentially upending the conventional understanding of the world’s largest tropical rain forest.

The deforestation that has stripped the Amazon since the 1970s has also exposed a long-hidden secret lurking underneath thick rain forest: flawlessly designed geometric shapes spanning hundreds of yards in diameter.

Alceu Ranzi, a Brazilian scholar who helped discover the squares, octagons, circles, rectangles and ovals that make up the land carvings, said these geoglyphs found on deforested land were as significant as the famous Nazca lines, the enigmatic animal symbols visible from the air in southern Peru.

“What impressed me the most about these geoglyphs was their geometric precision, and how they emerged from forest we had all been taught was untouched except by a few nomadic tribes,” said Mr. Ranzi, a paleontologist who first saw the geoglyphs in the 1970s and, years later, surveyed them by plane.

For some scholars of human history in Amazonia, the geoglyphs in the Brazilian state of Acre and other archaeological sites suggest that the forests of the western Amazon, previously considered uninhabitable for sophisticated societies partly because of the quality of their soils, may not have been as “Edenic” as some environmentalists contend.

Instead of being pristine forests, barely inhabited by people, parts of the Amazon may have been home for centuries to large populations numbering well into the thousands and living in dozens of towns connected by road networks, explains the American writer Charles C. Mann.

Read the full story at: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/15/world/americas/land-carvings-attest-to-amazons-lost-world.html?pagewanted=1&_r=1&ref=world

Brazil sees traces of more isolated Amazon tribes

BRASILIA, Brazil (Reuters) — Far more Indian groups than previously thought are surviving in Brazil’s Amazon rain forest isolated from the outside world but they risk extermination at the hands of encroaching loggers and miners, experts said on Wednesday.A study by Funai, the government’s National Indian Foundation, and seen by Reuters estimates that around 67 Indian groups live in complete isolation, up from previous estimates of around 40.”With the rate of destruction in the Amazon, it is amazing there are any isolated people left at all,” said Fiona Watson, campaigns coordinator with Survival International, an advocacy group for tribal peoples.Funai reviewed old and new discoveries of footprints, abandoned huts, and other signs of human life in the thicket of the world’s largest rain forest.”There are still vast unexplored areas and new indications of [Indian groups],” Marcelo dos Santos, head of Funai’s department of isolated Indians, told Reuters.Brazil is likely to have the largest number of uncontacted tribes in the world, Watson said.For complete story visit the link below:

Ancient Amazon Cities Found

Academic dogma asserted that early eyewitness accounts of large numbers of towns and villages in the Amazon were simply flights of fancy of the overactive imaginations of the European explorers. They even went further and advanced theories for why such civilizations could never have existed due to the poor quality of the soil. As is usually the case, the eyewitness accounts have proven to be true and the Academic establishment is left looking like a bunch of brain-dead, fanatical cult members mindlessly repeating the talking points of their Dear Esteemed Leaders and High Priests of Science. Read the National Georgraphic story below about the “controversial new theory” that shows people in the New World were just as advanced as those in the Old:

Dozens of ancient, densely packed, towns, villages, and hamlets arranged in an organized pattern have been mapped in the Brazilian Amazon, anthropologists announced today.

The finding suggests that vast swathes of “pristine” rain forest may actually have been sophisticated urban landscapes prior to the arrival of European colonists.

“It is very different from what we might expect using certain classic models of urbanism,” noted study co-author Michael Heckenberger, an anthropologist at the University of Florida in Gainesville.

Nevertheless, he said, the repeated patterns within and among settlements across the landscape suggest a highly ordered and planned society on par with any medievalEuropean town.

The finding supports a controversial theory that the Amazon River Basin teemed with large societies that were all but obliterated by disease when European colonists arrived in the 15th and 16th centuries.

The isolated tribes that remain in the Amazon today are the last survivors of these once great societies, according to the theory.

Read the full story here: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2008/08/080828-amazon-cities.html

Brazilian Stonehenge Discovered

The Academic establishment has long argued there were no civilizations much less advanced civilizations in Brazil or the Amazon. Apparently they were wrong. Read this story from the BBC about the discovery of a Brazilian Stonehenge:

 

Brazilian archaeologists have found an ancient stone structure in a remote corner of the Amazon that may cast new light on the region’s past.

The site, thought to be an observatory or place of worship, pre-dates European colonisation and is said to suggest a sophisticated knowledge of astronomy. Its appearance is being compared to the English site of Stonehenge.

It was traditionally thought that before European colonisation, the Amazon had no advanced societies. The archaeologists made the discovery in the state of Amapa, in the far north of Brazil. A total of 127 large blocks of stone were found driven into the ground on top of a hill.

Well preserved and each weighing several tons, the stones were arranged upright and evenly spaced. It is not yet known when the structure was built, but fragments of indigenous pottery found at the site are thought to be 2,000 years old.

What impressed researchers was the sophistication of the construction. The stones appear to have been laid out to help pinpoint the winter solstice, when the sun is at its lowest in the sky.

It is thought the ancient people of the Amazon used the stars and phases of the moon to determine crop cycles.

Although the discovery at Amapa is being compared to Stonehenge, the ancient stone circle in southern England, the English site is considerably older.

It is thought to have been erected some time between 3000 and 1600 BC.

Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/1/hi/world/americas/4767717.stm

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