Cahokia-Moundville-Etowah Artifacts Unearthed at Mayan site in Mexico

Over the past year there has been much debate about the possible presence of Maya in America, specifically in Georgia. Certain academics were quite vocal in their opposition to this idea stating emphatically that there was “no evidence” of a Maya presence in Georgia. So imagine my surprise when I stumbled upon this article from the magazine Archaeology dated to 2010. It clearly states that pottery from the Etowah site in Georgia had been found at the Mayan site of Tamtoc in Mexico. So why all the denials by academics over the past year that there is “no evidence” of a Mayan presence in Georgia? Were they unaware of this major research article in Archaeology magazine? Unlikely.

Furthermore, are we to believe that the inhabitants of Etowah went south but no Maya came north? The article below suggests just this sort of sillyness. The mental gymnastics academics will go through to avoid having the Maya in America is astounding as if there was some type of force field on the Rio Grande River that prevented people a thousand years ago from crossing it. But if this was a trade relationship then the influence likely went back and forth not just in one direction. Read an excerpt below from the Archaeology article to learn about the evidence of artifacts from Etowah (as well as Cahokia and Moundville) at the Mayan site of Tamtoc in northeastern Mexico:

This view looks eastward from the top of one of the long mounds above Tamtoc’s ceremonial plaza. The large ritual mound Cerro del Cubilete is on the left. (Courtesy Tom Gidwitz)

Tamtoc

by Tom Gidwitz

These projectile points, unearthed at Tamtoc, share a style common to points from the Mississippian culture that was prominent in what is now the Southeastern, Eastern and Midwest United States. (Courtesy Patricio Davila and Diana Zaragoza)

For decades, archaeologists have theorized that North America’s Late Woodland and Mississippian cultures drew inspiration from the Huasteca, but Davila and Zaragoza’s excavations at Tamtoc in the 1990s convinced them that cultural influence, and perhaps actual migration, spread from north to south. They unearthed objects that seemed to come from the American Southeast in about A.D. 900—a fragment of a sheet of hammered copper, a pointed metal hand tool, a piece of engraved shell, a cache of a dozen whole and twenty fragmented Cahokia projectile points, and pottery that could have come from sites to the north such as Etowah, and Moundville. When they dug into a terrace beside the site’s western mound, they found that, like the mounds at Cahokia, it had been piled up layer-by-layer in basket-sized loads, with dirt from pits that became the lagoons around the site.

“We dug and dug and dug,” says Davila, “but I understood nothing.” Then he read Garcilaso de la Vega’s La Florida del Inca, an account of the 1539 Hernando de Soto expedition to the Southeast. It describes huge Indian trade and war canoes that plied the waters of the Gulf of Mexico and the rivers of the Southeast. “We think there was a migration by sea,” says Davila.

Scholars have long recognized that both the Southeast and Huasteca had towns with artificial lagoons and platform mounds with thatched structures on top, engraved shell jewelry, imagery of feathered dancers, stone pipes, and ghostly pots that represent the dead with closed eyes, open mouths, and filed teeth. They have theorized that the cultural influence flowed from Mesoamerica northward, but the Tamtoc artifacts, other mounds in the Huasteca, and the region’s incised shell gorgets, post-date their earliest North American counterparts.

University of South Florida archaeologist Nancy White says that major cultural influences, as well as people, may well have traveled north to south. “We know other things may have moved from North to South America, things that may be considered less important or equally important, like tobacco.” The Mississippian motifs of the Late Prehistoric period that appear in the Huasteca do indicate that “at this late time people were probably moving around and sharing these ideas, but just a few things.” In the field, Martínez and Córdova want to see for themselves.

Read the full article here: http://www.huasteca.tomgidwitz.com/html/tamtoc.html

TAMTOC, ORIGIN OF THE MESOAMERICAN CULTURE

– The Monument 32 or Moon Calendar, more ancient than the Aztec Calendar.

– Investment of 800 thousand pesos for the rescue of the monolith.

The discovery of the Monument 32in Tamtoc, eight meters long, four meters and a half high, a thickness of 32 centimeters and a weight between 10 and 12 tons, can generate radical changes in the concepts of the Mesoamerican culture, which might have had its origin here, in the potosinian Huasteca.

The archaeologist Guillermo Ahuja informed that to conclude the rescue of the piece and to continue with the studies, the State Government has joined efforts with the INAH for an investment of 800 thousand pesos, so that by middle of May, when rescue works be finished, the archaeological site will open to the public.

He explained that the Sun Stone, astronomical instrument also known as Aztec Calendar, dates approximately 1400 A.D., while the monument 32 is from 700, that is to say 700 previous years and with a very advanced iconography in diverse areas of the knowledge.

According to archaeological research, the Monument 32 is one of the most ancient representations of the Mesoamerican art, where it is possible to appreciate the presence of two feminine figures, from which sprout watercourses, same that apparently indicate the importance of the vital liquid and its relation with the generation of life, since also birds are represented.

Four years after the State Government bought the property it was proposed the creation of a trust, which has received similar contributions from the State Government, INAH and from the Banamex Cultural Fund.

Ahuja points out that the idea is to shape an interdisciplinary group integrated by linguists, ethnologists, historians, archaeologists and epigraphists, to continue with the works of rescue and of epigraphic interpretation.

In the related to the archaeological work, he affirmed that the studies of the monolith 32 indicate that the huasteca culture is present from the preClassic to the postClassic, with elements that can give a radical change in the concepts that traditionally prevailed on the Mesoamerican culture.

Mexican monolith could change history

3,000-year-old carvings contain ‘new symbols in Mesoamerica’

MEXICO CITY – A carved monolith unearthed in Mexico may show that the Olmec civilization, one of the oldest in the Americas, was more widespread than thought or that another culture thrived alongside it 3,000 years ago.

Findings at the newly excavated Tamtoc archaeological site in the north-central state of San Luis Potosi may prompt scholars to rethink a view of Mesoamerican history that holds its earliest peoples were based in the south of Mexico.

“It is a very relevant indicator of an Olmec penetration far to the north, or of the presence of a new group co-existing with the Olmecs,” said archaeologist Guillermo Ahuja, who led a government team excavating the site for the past five years.

To read the story in its entirety visit:
http://articles.latimes.com/2006/may/13/science/sci-monolith13