Mayan Glyphs on Georgia, Florida Pottery?

Distribution of Swift Creek sites in Southeastern U.S. The arrival of corn at the Fort Center and Ortona sites in the Lake Okeechobee area of Florida by 200 AD coincides with a pottery tradition known as Swift Creek. In fact, this pottery tradition appears in the same places where the Hitchiti language was spoken thus […]

Did Maya mine blue pigment from Georgia?

One of the many mysteries involving the ancient Maya is the origin of a blue pigment they used to paint murals and buildings. Archaeologists have searched far and wide for the source of this pigment. It now appears that the largest source of the clay that makes this pigment can be found in southwest Georgia. […]

Rock Eagle & Rock Hawk (100 AD)

Rock Eagle is an effigy mound in the shape of a bird with its wings spread. It is believed to have been constructed around 2,000 years ago. It is one of only two such structures known to exist east of the Mississippi river with the second structure known as Rock Hawk also located nearby.

Were the Maya Mining Gold in Georgia?

Is there evidence that the Maya were in Georgia and Florida? If so, why were they there? Were they mining gold and shipping it back to Mexico? Does a gold artifact discovered in a Florida mound in the 1800s offer positive proof of this? Let’s look at the evidence and see what it suggests about […]

Forsyth Petroglyph Reveals Comet Impact?

Designs on the Forsyth Petroglyph in Georgia may include astronomical representations of stars, the constellation Draco, the Pleiades asterism, a comet, and meteors or comet fragments and may be a record of a comet impact event that caused a severe weather event in 536 AD.

Ossabaw Island burial site sheds light on Georgia’s prehistoric Indian culture

The recent excavation of a prehistoric American Indian burial site on Ossabaw Island revealed cremated remains, an unexpected find that offers a glimpse into ancient Indian culture along Georgia‚Äôs coast. State archaeologist David Crass of the Georgia Department of Natural Resources said prehistoric cremations were rare, particularly during the early time in which preliminary evidence […]

Kolomoki Mounds (500 AD)

The Kolomoki Mounds site is believed to have been the most populous Native American community north of Mexico during its time period. The site consists of nine earthen mounds built between the years A.D. 350 and 750.