Earliest turkey domestication found in Tennessee

Turkeys figured prominently into pre-contact Native American life, but the first archaeological evidence of probable domestication in the Southeast U.S. has just been found at a site in Tennessee.

More than 400 bones of Meleagris gallopavo silvestris, the eastern wild turkey, were found at the Fewkes site, dating to around 1250-1450, and were analyzed by zooarchaeologists Tanya Peres and Kelly Ledford of Florida State University. Writing today in the Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, Peres and Ledford explain how the Native Americans were raising and managing gobblers.

Read the full article here: http://www.forbes.com/sites/kristinakillgrove/2016/11/21/earliest-archaeological-evidence-of-turkey-domestication-found-in-tennessee

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Gary C. Daniels

Gary C. Daniels is an award-winning, Emmy-nominated television, video and multimedia writer and producer. He has a M.A. degree in Communications from Georgia State University in Atlanta, a B.F.A. degree in TV Production from the Savannah College of Art and Design and an A.A. degree in Art from the College of Coastal Georgia. He has appeared on the Travel Channel, Discovery Channel, Science Channel and History Channel. His History Channel appearance became the highest-rated episode in the network's history. He has a passion for Native American history and art. He is the founder and publisher of LostWorlds.org.