New Artifacts Suggest Mexican connection to Ohio’s Hopewell Culture

Jaguars and panthers aren’t from Indiana but they show up at the Mann Hopewell Site as beautifully detailed carvings. Put them together with clay figurines that have slanted eyes — not a Hopewell feature — and Linderman says we could be looking at a connection between Indiana and Central or South America.

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More early dwellings at Ocmulgee monument site, archaeologist finds

An ancient civilization of mound builders who lived near the Ocmulgee River just northeast of what is now downtown Macon may have been home to more native people than originally thought. Though the research, much of it done with a ground-scanning instrument to roughly map underground shapes and forms, is still under way, early analysis seems to indicate more unearthed dwellings at the site than were previously known to have existed.

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Ancient Massacre Discovered in New Mexico — Was It Genocide?

Seven skeletons discovered in a remote New Mexico canyon were victims of a brutal massacre that may have been part of an ancient campaign of genocide, archaeologists say. The victims—five adults, one child, and one infant—were members of an obscure native culture known as the Gallina, which occupied a small region of northwestern New Mexico around A.D. 1100

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Turquoise suggests new trade routes between ancient America and Mexico

Thirty years ago the archaeological scientists Garman Harbottle and Edward Sayre used neutron activation analysis to show that turquoise mosaics from Mexico, found as far away as the great Maya city of Chichén Itzá in Yucatan and dating back to around AD900, used raw material originating in the Cerrillos mines between Albuquerque and Santa Fe in New Mexico, an overland distance of some 3,200 km (2,000 miles).

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45-Foot Ancient Canoe Stuck In The Muck Of Weedon Island

A 45-foot canoe, buried for more than a thousand years and used by a long-dead culture of Native Americans was used to paddle over the open waters of the bay — unlike the other ancient canoes uncovered in Florida which were used to ply the calmer waters of lakes and rivers.

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Ancient artifacts provide insight to Upstate history

Searching the soil beneath this present-day farm, the researchers
have discovered almost a time capsule of relics from past cultures,
from pottery that dates back as many as 4,000 years to about 30 or 40
feet of a log fort built by Indians 600 to 700 years ago. Farther down, workers last year unearthed a cluster of rocks that
date back 10,000 years,

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Scientists hope Captiva Island dig can unlock Calusa mysteries

On the northernmost tip of Captiva Island stands a piece of southwest Florida history that may help scientists unlock the mysteries of an ancient culture. From the road lined with high-priced homes in the secluded South Seas Plantation, a mound with several peaks built by the Calusa Indians more than 2,000 years ago looks like any other clump of mangroves and vegetation.

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