New Serpent Mound could be world’s largest

To the untrained eye, there’s nothing special about the earthen hump that runs for hundreds of feet alongside picturesque Miami Bluff Drive and curves down along the edge of the woods toward the Mariemont Swimming Pool. At certain points, it’s undetectable from the road because trees, honeysuckle and weeds grow on parts of it. But […]

Saluda River artifacts going on display

COLUMBIA — Fans of the Saluda River now have a new place to learn about the area’s Native American history. Officials from South Carolina Electric & Gas and the Saluda Shoals Park are holding a ribbon-cutting ceremony on Wednesday to open a new display at the Saluda Shoals Environmental Education Center in Columbia. The center […]

Etowah Mounds Bird Man copper plate

Researchers reveal how prehistoric Native Americans of Cahokia made copper artifacts

EVANSTON, Ill. — Northwestern University researchers ditched many of their high-tech tools and turned to large stones, fire and some old-fashioned elbow grease to recreate techniques used by Native American coppersmiths who lived more than 600 years ago. This prehistoric approach to metalworking was part of a metallurgical analysis of copper artifacts left behind by […]

Ancient Seeds Sow Debate Over Sunflower-Farming Origins

Sunflowers were grown as a domesticated crop in Mexico more than 2,000 years ago, according to a new study. The new findings run counter to a theory that sunflower farming began in what is now the U.S. East and then trickled south into Mexico.

New Mexico’s Chaco Canyon: A Place of Kings and Palaces?

Kings living in palaces may have ruled New Mexico’s Chaco Canyon a thousand years ago, causing Pueblo people to reject the brawny, top-down politics in the centuries that followed, according to a University of Colorado at Boulder archaeologist.

Ancient Rock Art Depicts Exploding Star

A rock carving discovered in Arizona might depict an ancient star explosion
seen by Native Americans a thousand years ago, scientists announced today.

If confirmed, the rock carving, or “petroglyph” would be the only known
record in the Americas of the well-known supernova of the year 1006.

Heavens offer unique clues to the seasons

Before the advent of calendars, the only way to mark the changing of the seasons was through direct observation. Ancient peoples observed the passage of the sun north from the Winter Solstice, and then south from the Summer Solstice. In Mesoamerica the people observed the sun passing directly overhead twice a year by using special tubes in the temples that pointed at the zenith.

Ancient Earthworks Electronically Rebuilt, To Become A Traveling Exhibit

Native American cultures that once flourished in Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana and West Virginia constructed geometric and animal-shaped earth works that often rivaled Stonehenge in their astronomical accuracy. This lost heritage from the Adena, Hopewell and Fort Ancient cultures is returning in the form of a traveling exhibit that will include virtual reconstructions of earthworks from 39 sites.

Archeologists to search for lost mission

Amateur archeologists will get a chance to search this summer for the lost mission of Santa Isabel de Utinahica, built in the wilderness in the 1600s for a lone friar who was dispatched to evangelize among the Indians on the edge of Spain’s colonial empire.

Mexican-syle artifacts from Mann Hopewell Site

New Artifacts Suggest Mexican connection to Ohio’s Hopewell Culture

Jaguars and panthers aren’t from Indiana but they show up at the Mann Hopewell Site as beautifully detailed carvings. Put them together with clay figurines that have slanted eyes — not a Hopewell feature — and Linderman says we could be looking at a connection between Indiana and Central or South America.

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