About Gary C. Daniels

Gary C. Daniels is an award-winning, Emmy-nominated television, video and multimedia writer and producer. He has a passion for history, archaeology, and astronomy. He is the founder and publisher of LostWorlds.org.
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admin has written 368 articles so far, you can find them below.

Temples, human sacrifices and a mysterious crystal skull

The mystical skull was supposedly discovered on New Year’s Day of 1924, by Anna Mitchell-Hedges, an orphan from Port Colborne, Ont. Anna had been adopted by British adventurer and story-spinner Frederick Mitchell-Hedges, who was excavating the Lubaantun ruins, looking for clues about the lost city of Atlantis.

Archaeological bookends in Copán Valley

A short drive from the main Maya ruins at Copán, a forested hillside holds a cluster of mounds that Peabody Museum archaeologists believe date from near the end of the great Maya civilization that once dominated the region.

Mexico finds bones suggesting Toltec child sacrifice

The grisly find of the buried bones of 24 pre-Hispanic Mexican children may be the first evidence that the ancient Toltec civilization sacrificed children, an archeologist studying the remains said on Monday.

The bones, dating from 950 AD to 1150 AD and dug up at the Toltecs’ former capital Tula, north of present day Mexico City, indicated the children had been decapitated in a group.

Earliest Mixtec Cremations Found; Show Elite Ate Dog

An ancient burial site in Mexico contains evidence that Mixtec Indians conducted funerary rituals involving cremation as far back as 3,000 years ago.

The find represents the earliest known hints that Mixtecs used this burial practice, which was later reserved for Mixtec kings and Aztec emperors, according to researchers who excavated the site.

New Maya Website Reveals Temples Through Time

This web site provides some 250 19th and early 20th century drawings,
prints, and photographs, most rare or previously unpublished,
revealing how these Maya sites were imaged by early explorers and
scholars.

Ancient pyramid found in central Mexico City

Archeologists have discovered the ruins of an 800-year-old Aztec pyramid in the heart of the Mexican capital that could show the ancient city is at least a century older than previously thought.

Ancients knew chocolate was good

esidents of Central America were enjoying chocolate drinks more than 3,000 years ago, a half millennium earlier than previously thought, new research shows.

Pollution said destroying pre-Aztec ruins

Oil refineries and power stations pumping acid air pollutants along Mexico’s Gulf coast threaten to erase carved stone murals at the pre-Aztec ruined city of El Tajin, a scientist said on Sunday.

Ancient Mexicans Took Sacrifice Victims From Afar

Ancient Mexicans brought human sacrifice
victims from hundreds of miles (km) away over centuries to sanctify a
pyramid in the oldest city in North America, an archaeologist said on
Wednesday.

DNA tests on the skeletons of more than 50 victims discovered in 2004
in the Pyramid of the Moon at the Teotihuacan ruins revealed they
were from far away Mayan, Pacific or Atlantic coastal cultures.

New theory: Rats spread fatal illness

Mexicans have long been taught to blame diseases brought by the Spaniards for wiping out most of their Indian ancestors. But recent research suggests things may not be that simple.

New Mexico’s Chaco Canyon: A Place of Kings and Palaces?

Kings living in palaces may have ruled New Mexico’s Chaco Canyon a thousand years ago, causing Pueblo people to reject the brawny, top-down politics in the centuries that followed, according to a University of Colorado at Boulder archaeologist.

Ancient Rock Art Depicts Exploding Star

A rock carving discovered in Arizona might depict an ancient star explosion
seen by Native Americans a thousand years ago, scientists announced today.

If confirmed, the rock carving, or “petroglyph” would be the only known
record in the Americas of the well-known supernova of the year 1006.

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